John Gregg Deaf?

The following link says, in its list of interesting facts about the deaf, that John R. Gregg was deaf.  I would be very surprised if this were true, especially since Gregg shorthand is phonetically based, and many deaf people have no concept of phonetics.  In one of my American Sign Language classes, I read a book about the many famous deaf people in history.  Admittedly, the text was not comprehensive, but I do not recall his name being included.

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  1. I did a Google search. This is the
    link:
     
    http://p3.csun.edu/p3access/Calendar2001/0601facts.html
    —– Original Message —–
    From: JohnSapp

    To: Gregg Shorthand
    Sent: Tuesday, August 03, 2004 3:04 PM
    Subject: Re: John Gregg Deaf?

    New Message on Gregg
    Shorthand

    John Gregg
    Deaf?

    Reply

     
    Reply to Sender   Recommend
    Message 4 in Discussion

    From: JohnSapp

    Wow, I had no idea that that he was deaf!  The whole
    time he lived in the United States, he was deaf. 
    Amazing.
     
    Where did you get that snippet, by the
    way?
    View other groups in this
    category.

  2. If I remember correctly–I'll have to track down the material–Dr. Gregg reported that he was a poor student, and when very young was struck on the head by a teacher, leaving him with impaired hearing.    I don't believe he ever became completely deaf, and certainly was never a user of American Sign Language. 

  3. Alex:
    Thanks for the list of books. I was able to find the biography by Leslie Cowan at a local public library and have requested the book to review. When I did a search within the online card catalog, I was able to locate numerous Gregg shorthand books dating back many years. Now I need to buckle down and starting learning shorthand rather than reading about the man who gave us this great technique.
    Nancy (KCChiefgal04)

    —– Original Message —–
    From: Alex
    Date: Tuesday, August 17, 2004 7:29 am
    Subject: Re: John Gregg Deaf?

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  4. From "The Story of Gregg Shorthand" (Louis A. Leslie), p. 31:   "I should explain at this point that the reason why I was so stupid in school was that in the first class, the teacher having been called out of the room, we boys got talking, as boys will.  The teacher, coming back and finding me talking to another boy, caught our heads and banged them together, and in doing that, he broke the drum of my ear, so that I suffered all through my school days from that, and I have suffered from that more or less all my life.  I didn't tell them at home about it, because they had a great deal of the old Scotch covenanter theory of life.  The injunction to spare the rod is to spoil the child was a religious injunction with them.  I knew from past experience that if I were punished at school (that being evidence of wrongdoing on my part) it was supplemented at home even more rigorously than was the case at school.  So I didn't tell them.  But I suffered with this, and couldn't hear, and consequently didn't make much progress at school."

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