Drill on blends

One of the ways of increasing speed in writing is in practicing curve consonant blends.  Try the following sentence as a warm up:
“The band apparently planned to print plenty of bonds to buy the land owned by the blind Indians.”
Nifty.
The following selection is a great drill in multiple consonant blends.  Start slow first, so that there is no hesitation in the writing.  Pay attention to the phrasing, which will ease the writing.  Gradually build speed until the curves become natural.  Give it a try and let me know what you think.
“I am pleased to tell you that your friend says he will be glad to bring you the corrected bills for this work, before they have been presented at this month’s meeting of the claims committee.  Your plan was certainly much cheaper, and the free labor which was supplied by the active members of the organization and the neighbors deserves great credit.
I saw an analysis of the director’s report of the finances of this progressive organization, and the gross income from all sources wasn’t above the company’s payroll for its employees.  I am confident that the value of its assets was greatly reduced by the recent action of the Government, which issued a report explaining this action clearly.
I presume you will approve the appropriation for the new process that promises to increase the organization’s profits.”

(by chuck for everyone)

4 comments Add yours
  1. Pretty good!  It is a fun drill, with so many tails, LOL.  That's very nice penmanship there.  Some suggestions:   (1) try blending these phrases: "I am pleased", "for this", "this month's", "they have been", "I saw", "from all", "which was", "he will be glad", "above the", "for its", "wasn't" (o hook-s-nt), "I am confident", "I presume", "to increase". (2) check the outlines for: "Indians" (no "e" circle), "corrected" (c-r, unjoined t), "free" (no angle between f and r; the whole word should be written with one sweep of the pen), "active" (a-c-v), "confident" (c-f), "appropriation" (no o-hook, because there is a "pro" syllable).

  2. Thanks!

    It is good to know when I forget a brief form. 🙂 Since I speeded through that writing, I did make a few theory mistakes, but the transcription remains the same. Thanks for giving me the specifics. 🙂

    Since I went the whole summer without using Gregg, I did lose touch with my brief forms. Thus, I am reviewing them now. 🙂

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