Best system for pre-med students: perhaps Simplified?

Hi Gregg devotees!

I am a brand-new member of this MSN Group. I know y’all get asked this a million times, so I’ll be very specific with my request.

I want to learn shorthand for Optometry school. In September, I’ll start a full-time pre-optometry undergraduate program. It seems to me that I need a shorthand system that: – uses many abbrevations in order to capture spoken lectures
– is flexible enough to handle very technical medical terminology

I reviewed Chuck’s comparison chart and past message board posts. Diamond Jubilee seems to be geared toward business dictation. Anniversary seems to take too much time for me to learn when I already have a full workload to memorize in the science classes. Simplified seems to be the choice for faster speech dictation. Will it be suitable for medical terminology?

One last consideration: I have tendonitis in my outer wrists from too much computer usage. I like the idea of not relying on a laptop to take lecture notes and instead, using pen and paper for note-taking. However, there was a posting from a secretary to the Sorehands mailing list that advised against learning shorthand because she said “the speed really causes you to tense up your hand and arm.” (http://www.tifaq.com/information/archive/shorthand-jun98-martha_sonia.txt). Are there members in this group who’ve had repetitive stress pain from long hours of shorthand?

Thank you for any input.

-tony

(by tbk for everyone)

7 comments Add yours
  1. Gregg doesn't cause or exasperate tendonitis more than writing longhand. The strokes are larger, and not so jagged and jumpy as writing longhand. When I write in my diary, I do every other entry SH, and when I used to get writers cramp doing the LH entries, I'd often switch over to SH and feel just fine! But it's all how you do it as well. It's like playing guitar or piano. When learning, you need to be absolutly certain that you relax your arms from the shoulders to the elbows to the hands. Because lots of beginners will mirror the hell their minds are going through in tensing their elbows like they're trying to squeeze the fun out of life between their wee lil joints. This causes a chain reaction of wearing themselves out mentally and physically, sometimes causing chronic elbow or wrist pain, limiting the quality (or ability) for barre chords, that notorious F, or for the piano aficionado missing that *#^&ing &*(#ing jumps in Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C#m from low C# to the B in the left hand…grrrrr…EVERY TIME! I practiced…and practiced…and most importantly, tensing up like that affects your speed. So learn to be loose, and consciously check yourself sometimes, and I think you should be just fine.   An easy way to do it is while you're writing or practicing piano like the day won't continue without making that jump is just move from your neck on down. "Is my neck tense?" Relax… "Is my shoulder tense?" Relax…"Is my elbow tense?" Relax…"Is my wrist tense?" CRAP YES IT IS!!! YOU TRY RACHMANINOFF!   As far as other things are concerned (and what's to not be concerned about these days, what with Wilcox 2% milk not being a staple of European diets) *I* would venture to say that Simplified would suite you just fine, and then you can pick up a Gregg medical shorthand manual or dictionary…as a matter of fact I have one called "GREGG Medical Shorthand Manual and Dictionary" I have no interest in medicine beyond what it can do for me, which shows you that if I, with no specific motivation, can find it, YOU CAN TOO! Enough with motivation…But a combination of Simplified (or DJ, but why not go ahead with Simplified…it's what psetus's (still…groan) learning…but Gregg's a life-learning sort of thing…like when I spent 25 years in the wilderness making samuri swords…you're always a student) (After 25 years you'd think I'd be certain of the spelling) Anyways, with a combination of Simplified or DJ and a dabbling or full dose of medical shorthands specific to becoming the optician you want to be, I'm sure you'll do just fine! … … LOLOL!! HAHA. Just kidding about the optician. I hope you become a full time oculistical ophthalmologist!! And who knows? Maybe someday you'll implant a cyborg chip into my eye…and stab me with your Gregg pencil while you're at it for the joke…in the mean time, apply yourself diligently and you'll have time before you begin your training to reach a decent level of proficiency and possibly be making notes, dare I say…as legible and understandable as my posts! Get out! Nuh uh!   (I'm sorry your first (is it your first?) post is replied to by me…normally we have the Chuck, John, Marc, Marc, Marc, Mark, Marc, and Andrew squad come in to prep people first…but such is life) (No the John isn't JOHN R G. He tried to join…but we had to kick him out…he kept writing all this nonsense about brief forms or something…totally illiterate dude…) UT, ./[tyler]

  2. Oh my gosh…lolol. I just had to say as I glanced over my post to make sure I didn't inadvertantly write something about your great grandmother twice removed that I shouldn't've… "a dabbling or full dose of medical shorthands specific to becoming the optician" HA! Oh my gosh…just had to point that out incase noone caught it…I certainly didn't til I read it! Oh and about that "Gregg pencil"…every stenographer knows that nothing but BIC rollerballs in the office 40 count pack'll do for shorthand! Don't let me lead you astray with any pencil nonsense. Matter of fact, just ignore me straightway and straightforth and someone's knocking…gotta go! ./[tyler]

  3. I would recommend either Anniversary or Simplified.  Both of those systems have quite a few textbooks dedicated to medical shorthand.  However, since your vocabulary will be specialized, there will be additional shortcuts that you will learn, whether Anniv or Simplified — some memorization will be inevitable.   In terms of strain, if you do long hours of anything you will become sore!  You need to relax and enjoy the writing part.  If you already have an injury, don't overdo it!  Anxiety can kick in and contribute to strain.  Believe it or not, part of avoiding soreness starts by the simple act of holding the pen!  So there are lots of tricks that you will learn to avoid injuries.  Also, when you start taking dictation, you start with slow short takes.  You gradually build speed and length.  Compare it to running: do you run 10 miles the first time you do it?

  4. Before I started medical school in 1983, I learned Simplified; and I've been happy ever since. Simplified has enough abbreviating principles to be fast but doesn't have so many that the memory load is burdensome.   Then go to Medical Shorthand and Dictionary. That will get you up to speed on medical terms. I actually learned a lot of them shorthand outlines while in medical school.   If you have the time and the interest, consider going into an advanced version like Congressional reporting. I didn't come across this book until 1998, but I wish I had seen in sooner.   If you want additional advice, please let me know.   Brian

  5. Brian – is that the Expert Shorthand Speed Studies book you mentioned?

    Kevin

    > —–Original Message—–
    > From: Gregg Shorthand [mailto:[email protected]]
    > Sent: 23 February 2005 14:12
    > To: Gregg Shorthand
    > Subject: Re: Best system for pre-med students: perhaps Simplified?
    >
    > ———————————————————–
    >
    > New Message on Gregg Shorthand
    >
    > ———————————————————–
    > From: bjb29407
    > Message 6 in Discussion
    >
    > Before I started medical school in 1983, I learned
    > Simplified; and I've been happy ever since. Simplified has
    > enough abbreviating principles to be fast but doesn't have so
    > many that the memory load is burdensome. Then go to
    > Medical Shorthand and Dictionary. That will get you up to
    > speed on medical terms. I actually learned a lot of them
    > shorthand outlines while in medical school. If you have the
    > time and the interest, consider going into an advanced
    > version like Congressional reporting. I didn't come across
    > this book until 1998, but I wish I had seen in sooner. If
    > you want additional advice, please let me know. Brian
    >
    > ———————————————————–
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