Three letter abbreviations in shorthand

I work for an airline and was taking down some notes from a booking.  I had to take down three letter city codes and found that it is easiest to do in Teeline shorthand, which is NOT phonetic, but alphabetic.  I had to take down LHR (London Heathrow) and MAA (Madras) and DXB (Dubai).  Now how would you go about taking abbreviations or codes like this in Gregg?  And I mean Gregg, not spelling them out as an exception and not writing the actual city name instead of the code.  Also Teeline is better than Greeg or Pitman for taking down other sometimes unreadable babble like weird website names etc.  Is there some trick for this in Gregg?

(by wordsigner
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  1. In Anniversary Intersections are wrote on top of each other.  COD, it's C then OD written over the C, so it's sort of crossed over.  A.M. is A with an M written through it.  Does this make sense? You could do the same with yours, although some may be harder then others… Debbi

  2. Oh sometimes with codes or other things like initials I'll write in longhand or Speedwriting.  Sometimes until I can learn it in Gregg or just because it is easier.  With minutes I would write the person's intials in longhand so I could identify who was talking when.  It was easier for me. Debbi

  3. Oh, here's what the anniversary manual says about Intersections:   The expedient known as intersection, or the writing of one character through another, is sometimes useful for special phrases.  In applyig this expedient the write must rely very largely upon his own judgement.  In his daily work as stenogrpher or reporter he may find some terms peculiar to the business in which hs is engaged occurring so frequently that special forms may be adopted for them that will be brief and yet absolutely distinctive.  Very often the writien of one character through another will meet the exignecy.  

  4. I seem to recall examples given in theReporters Courses where two and three digit abbreviations for names of persons and places may be done in longhand especially for quick reference in looking over a document ssuch as a court transcript when asked by a lawyer in court to quote a recent statement or one made earlier in the trial. I think the key to your personal use is what comes faster to you in rapid stenography, and also in the case of unusual names and terms it would probably then be beneficial towrite them out (in Gregg of course). DOC

  5. You can use a combination of intersection and the way it sounds to make an outline. But if you can write as a whole word is even faster.  For example:   LHR:  it is pronounced: "eleichar", so you write l – a – ch – intersected r (on the ch) MAA:  this one you can write m – a – a, with the second a over the m (no intersection) DXB:  you can write d – x – b (this is an easy one to write, no intersection)   Some classical examples (no intersection, just by the way it sounds):   ABC:  a – b – s – e CBS:  s – e – b – s Ph.D.:  p – d (with an h dot inside the angle between the p and d) NEA:  n – e – a (a over the n)   If you want to post some of the most common city codes, we can make a table.

  6. How many do I know?  Of the top of my head:   ABZ LHR LGW CGD JKF LAX WAS SVO SVX LED ICN PVG TYO OSA KIX BKK HKG MNL CMN CMS DEL BOM HYD KRT DOH DXB AUH COK MAA SEZ MLE MRU CPT JNB LOS LUN DAR NBO HRE MCT RUH SYD MEL PER BNE AKL CHC MAN EDI SIN KUL JKT CGK DPS AMM BEY CAI DAM JED DMM SAH BAH KWI THR KHI DAC ISB LHE PEW ACC EBB MNL DUR RCB PLS VFA WDH MPM KTM NRT SPK HKD FRA AMS HEL BUD ZRH BOS MIA CHI PEK and of course FUK (Fukuoka, Japan)   Probably know at least as many or more by heart, but don't use them that often.

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