Aesop’s Fables in Gregg eBook!

Hello one, hello all, hello two (but not you, seven…I know your kind):

Well, I scanned in a nice little (3.75mb) copy of Fables in Gregg Shorthand and I sent it to angelfishy’s Andrew Owen (or should I say Andrew’s angelfishy?) and Sir John Sapp of…well you know…but neither has posted it up yet, SOOOOO, if anybody is wanting to get ahold of this eBook through e-mail, just write me, and I’ll send you a copy! It’s [email protected].
UT,
./[tyler]

(by psetus for everyone)

12 comments Add yours
  1. Sorry Tyler, every time I try, the site won't let me post new documents. Maybe it's a side effect of upgrading my storage space! I need to contact MSN about it. Really cool booklet, though.
    ___________
    Go, Speedwriter, go!

  2. I agree with saying it is a really cool booklet!!! thanks psetus.    If I knew how to put the adobe reader and all shorthand documents into my Palm Tungsten T3, then I could read them where ever I go.

  3. Okay, I'm having a few transcription challenges here. Keeping in mind that I've just begun learning Centennial, I think I've done a fair job of this. Unfortunately, some of these forms have thrown me, and I got bogged down towards the end. After pulling my hair out over them, I thought I'd submit my humble efforts for your assistance. I have matched lines in my transcription to the shorthand text in Tyler's book. Each "X" represents a form or outline I've not been able to transcribe. You will notice that I have problems with the "u" words.  If you notice any other transcription errors, please assist!   -Stenomouse   The Apple Tree and the Rose   Near an apple tree grew a rose.
    The flower, seeing how much she was X,
    said "you cannot compare with me. May
    blossoms are lovely to the sight and sweet
    to the nostrils. True, the apple tree
    is bigger, but what joy does he give
    to man?" Hearing this, the apple
    tree answered, "Even though you are lovely and
    sweet-smelling, you are not so XXX in
    a [good] and  X X" //  "And
    X?" The apple tree answered:
    "X give X flowers to man
    without first you[r] X me [with you] X.
    I give [my?] fruit to all –even
    to those who threw stones at me."

  4. Hi Stenomouse,    I switched from Simplified to Anniversary, so I know how frustrating it can be when you hit an outline that doesn't make sense. But you've done very well. I've filled in the blanks.   Kevin   Near an apple tree grew a rose.
    The flower, seeing how much she was X (admired)
    said "you cannot compare with me. May (my)
    blossoms are lovely to the sight and sweet
    to the nostrils. True, the apple tree
    is bigger, but what joy does he give
    to man?" Hearing this, the apple
    tree answered, "Even though you are lovely and
    sweet-smelling, you are not so XXX  (worthy,) in (not)
    a [good] (good) and  X X (friendly heart)" //  "And
    X (why not)?" The apple tree answered:
    "X (you do not) give X (your) flowers to man
    without first you[r] X me [with you] X. (you wound him with your thorns)
    I give [my?] (my) fruit to all –even
    to those who threw (throw) stones at me."

  5. Kevin:   Truth be told, I've only begun my second unit in the Centennial manual, so transcribing that fable was a real accomplishment for me. But  "I couldn't a dunit witout ye! Arr."  Now that it is transcribed, my goal is to write it over and over until my fingers bleed and the entire thing is etched permanently upon my brain. LOL.   Thank you so very much for your assistance — I really appreciate your time. Frankly, this entire group ROCKS. I'm so glad to have such a great resource to draw upon for my otherwise lonely study of shorthand!    Kindest, Stenomouse Gregg Speedwriter Wannabe

  6. ___Chuck___ Centennial doesn't have the special rules about the R that Anniversary and Pre-Anniversary have.  That's one of the reasons you couldn't transcribe some of the words. —–   Which is one of the reasons, I'm guessing, I've wrestled with abandoning Centennial, and just learning Anniversary outright. However, I enjoy the slower pacing of the Centennial material. As long as I don't have to "unlearn" lots of stuff, then I suppose I'll just continue with Centennial, and immediately follow it with Anniversary. I'll probably copy the Anniversary brief forms and phrases, and simply memorize them as a part of my Centennial instruction.   Do you forsee any difficulties with such an approach?   Kindest, Stenomouse Gregg Speedwriter Wannabe

  7. Not really, as long as you pace yourself. The Anniversary manual is very dense!

    There are some additional differences — for example, the way you join the o with an r or an l is different in Centennial and in Anniversary. And also, some blended consonants do not exist in Centennial. You will notice these differences as you move along.

    About phrases and the brief forms, learn and practice them until you can write them, without thinking. There are slight differences in the phrasing in both systems, but for the most part you will be fine. And also, when you are writing material, read aloud as you write so that the outline is retained in your brain. This is important, especially when you are learning.

  8. ___AO___ Did anyone notice that the Fables are posted on my site? —–   Absolutely! Great job. However, just a reminder that this collection of fables is NOT the Aesop's Fables collection. The Aesop's Fables book begins with "The Ape and the Camel," "The Miller, his Son and their Ass," "The Nurse and the Wolf," and so forth. Each tale ends with a brief moral.   Kindest, Stenomouse

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