NV Courts Require Pen Shorthand Writers

Just an FYI…
Today, I was browsing the employment site of the NV Supreme Court. (I’m thinking of returning to the court management field). And I saw an opening for a courtroom clerk II that required that you take pen shorthand at 70 wpm. It’s been a long time since I’ve seen an ad requiring pen shorthand. — Vic/San Jose CA

(by vincere3 for everyone)

12 comments Add yours
  1. Chuck:

    They required transcription. I believe it was for the brief notes you take when you are a courtroom clerk. I used to be a Supervising Deputy Court II in the San Jose Municipal Court System. The courtroom clerks generally develop a shorthand for taking various notes about the Judge's decisions to later enter into the official docket. The notes generally consisted of bail status, custody issues, continuances, etc. You would'nt depend on a court reporter for notes, because most court cases don't require a transcript. In the Traffic Court or Small Claims, verbatim reporters aren't used. The courtroom clerks is responsible for the record. Shorthand is back! — Vic

  2. Vic:

    This pleases me beyond belief!

    🙂

    I can think of other situations where Gregg (or Pitman) would be absolutely essential–as opposed to machine shorthand.

    I've noticed more and more ads calling for pen shorthand. It seems that in confidential, important meetings, recordings are illegal,but the good old stenography isn't. Smart businesses should wake up and smell the coffee. 🙂

  3. An interesting side note (hopefully I don't digress too much)   In Texas, you must take the state test to be a court reporter (official or deposition). Pen shorthand is STILL accepted on the test.  Whether or not any court or depo firm would actually HIRE a pen writer is a matter of debate, but anyone disciplined enough to pass the test can be a certified shorthand reporter. That is, if you can do the following: Five minutes of each:         Q&A @ 225 wpm         Jury Charge @ 200 wpm         Literary @ 180 wpm  oh, and don't forget the 95% accuracy!! but in all fairness, it is the accuracy of your transcript you turn in, not your actual notes.   but there are some of the small or less populated districts that might beg for any CSR (certified shorthand reporter), since a few jurisdictions don't even HAVE official court reporters.   Just somethin' to think about

  4. I think we're onto something here.  A way to quantify progress in Gregg studies.  I'm thinking about researching the requirements to be a CSR in each state, and nationally, and posting in the documents section.  Boy!  I don't think I will ever be a reporter in Texas.  Does anyone offer a certification for Certified Shorthand Secretary, or something like that geared toward the business field, that might have less rigorous requirements?

  5. Most states have the same requirements for court reporters as Texas, as do most Canadian provinces.   UK court reporters have very similar requirements but sometimes they have a kind of "junior" or "apprentice" designation which requires slightly less, like 160 wpm for literary or jury charge.   Individual states and provinces usually have publicly accessible websites which would show when the next exams are and the required speeds and accuracy for each exam.

  6. I am not aware of a Certified Shorthand Secretary officially in Texas. That's probably since almost everything is done on word processors these days.   If you would like to have documented proof, you might contact a local court reporting school or program.  You could talk to the teachers.  One of them, or more than one, might be very interested that people still learn pen shorthand (a few of us, anyhow).  They might let you sit in on dictation classes, or let you audit the classes.  If you find a really cool one, they might be willing to sign a notarized affidavit stating you can write at a certain speed. Some of my teachers when I studied shorthand were very interested in the history of shorthand.    I would be interested in you posting the requirements for shorthand reporters in each state. I would like to see how many still allow pen writers to sit for the test. If you would like, I can send you all the requirements for Texas. Oddly enough, all you need to sit for the test is an instructor from a court reporting school to attest that you can pass the requirements for the test. You don't have to actually have a degree (although I'm sure most firms would).   Have a Happy Thanksgiving everyone. This is def. a very cool group and a lot of interesting, cool people. I'm very glad I found it!!

  7. I believe you can "certify" as a professional secretary or administrative assistant with specialties in legal, etc. You may want to check the association site. What about hearing reporters? The wpm requirements are lower. I seen a reference to hearing reporter exams on the State of California website. –Vic/San Jose CA

  8. That's a good idea Debbi. I would be willing to compile all the information that John S. would need for California. John, perhaps you could develop a template, and we could post information for you. Let me know… — Vic/San Jose CA

  9. In California, hearing reporters often work for the State recording quasi-judicial proceedings such as the Labor Relation dispute hearings. The speed requirements are generally less that a CSR, for instance, 180 wpm. Many of these reporters take machine and/or pen shorthand. Oftentimes, court reporting students who don't reach 225 wpm requirement for court reporters in CA opt for a hearing reporter position.

    Also, I saw a job listing for Board Clerks. (They work for the County Board of Supervisors). They were required to record minutes using shorthand as well. You had to submit a supplemental application indicating what type of system you would use to take notes. I believe the wpm requirement was 50 wpm. Pen shorthand is back! — Vic/San Jose CA

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