Ugliest Gregg shorthand book ever?

Hi, all.
I recently found a very cheap copy of “Gregg Shorthand for the Administrative Assistant”, Centennial Edition, 1990.  The Centennial materials have always struck me as a little rough, but honest to goodness, this has to be the ugliest book in the Gregg Series.  There’s not a single photograph or other interesting graphic in the whole book, just page after page of connected matter with accents, borders, headings etc. in an irritating blue color. 
Some of the other centennial books have color photos of office environments and shorthand in use, but this book has nothing.  I can’t imagine anything less inspiring for a student to tackle. 
I wonder what possessed McGraw-Hill to put out such a bland volume . . . maybe the whole Centennial project was running out of steam by then?
Alex

(by alex for everyone)

8 comments Add yours
  1. Yeah its a real shame that Gregg Shorthand lost steam. I sometimes find it hard to believe that such a beautiful and well though out system, one that had fans all over the world, is now left to but a few people to enjoy.

    I've always found something mesmerizing about the curves of Gregg Shorthand, unlike any other system. When written fluently, it just looks so amazing. Its brevity is also a miracle. Well…. we can only dream.

  2. People sometimes ask me if I am writing Arabic script. Because
    Mohammed banned iconographic images calligraphy has always been
    very big in Islamic countries as a major form of religious art. If you
    go to the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul/Constantinople and look up
    on the walls you will see large plaques with Arabic script on them.
    (Plaque = "..a flat ornamental plate or tablet fixed to a wall." – wiki)

    Sometimes when I am trying out new ways of writing a complex
    word or phrase one of the configurations will happen to strike me
    as being particularly artistically pleasing. I draw a big circle
    around it forming an image sort of like a plaque with script inside of it.

    Richard Harper

    On Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 2:37 AM, MICHAEL_LISITSA
    wrote:
    > New Message on Gregg Shorthand
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    > Ugliest Gregg shorthand book ever?
    >
    > Reply
    > Reply to Sender Recommend Message 2 in Discussion
    > From: MICHAEL_LISITSA
    > Yeah its a real shame that Gregg Shorthand lost steam. I sometimes find it
    > hard to believe that such a beautiful and well though out system, one that
    > had fans all over the world, is now left to but a few people to enjoy.
    >
    > I've always found something mesmerizing about the curves of Gregg Shorthand,
    > unlike any other system. When written fluently, it just looks so amazing.
    > Its brevity is also a miracle. Well…. we can only dream.
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  3. There's an uglier book out there.  When I was in high school our advanced class was comprised of Forkner writers and Gregg writers.  We had a text book that was for both, and edition for Forkner and an edition for Gregg.  The shorthand in that book was dreadful.  It was Series 90.    I was so offended I sold the book back at the end of the year.  I now wish I had kept it as an artifact.  It was really ugly stuff.

  4. Forkner and Gregg as a matched set? I wonder how the rights owners dealt with that? My Forkner book is published by Gage. I also wonder why? Seems like a lot of work, when there would only be a few years of classes in that situation. Not a money-maker.

    I've heard of TeeLine and Pitman being in the same speed building class in community college in England. A lesson might concentrate on com/con/… , but you'd have to know how to write them in your own theory.

  5. Yes, the texts were similar except for the shorthand.  The Forkner looked good, the Gregg was really disgraceful.  I hated using the book.  And it was not a very exciting book.  There was no internal art or anything colorful.    I think they did the two versions because of the situation that we had.  The school was giving Forkner a try, but also teaching Gregg.  When you combined the writers into one class for Advanced Shorthand, you needed a unified text to teach from.  I think Forkner was a little too late.  I would imagine there were other schools doing the same experiment. 

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