Number consonant chart

Here’s an interesting chart linking consonants to numbers in an aid to create mnemonic devices. You have to scroll around half way down the page.

http://userpage.fu-berlin.de/~tanguay/memory_main.htm

I find the concept really interesting, and I can imagine after a while it could really become second nature (like shorthand) but I’m not too happy with the ‘r’ being there. ‘r’ is not a stable consonant, especially when it is used at the end of words like “care” or “par”. You can also see that the sounds are paired phonetically with their soft counterparts just like in Gregg (eg. p,b f,v sh,ch,,j t,d s,z).

Michael.

(by michael_lisitsa for
everyone)

2 comments Add yours
  1. I should try that for storytelling. I'm trying to refresh a story I told two years ago, for guild (practise) on Friday, and three times now I've gotten up and done "just one small thing" right after the intro. Love the story, just not in the mood to work on it. I need to put a chocolate cake in the kitchen to keep me going.

  2. I used to study memory systems a lot when I was much younger.

    In a job interview I aced, the interviewer somewhat obviously fired off
    a half dozen questions in a row without allowing me to get a word in,
    and then waited — so I said, "I counted six questions there, if it's alright
    I'll answer them in the order they were asked in…" I did that using the
    simplest of mnemonic systems. (Make an image of each item, and
    link it in an association with the next.)

    In terms of the sound-number system– the Lorayne pairings are very
    similar to other's who wrote slightly before he did. (Most of them seemed
    to have written around the time when Gregg Shorthand was also
    very popular, by the way.) So I have looked at many different suggestions
    for which words to construct out of the pairings. (e.g. "Tie" for one.)
    And the Lorayne suggestions are fairly good. But they were done in
    the 1950s originally (or almost all were done then) and a lot of them
    are more suitable for those times and circumstances. I think it's optimal,
    if I were to get back into doing all that, to develop my own set of
    words for the various numbers. (I seem to recall offhand that 34, m-r,
    is mower, or in some systems mare. I haven't run a lawn-mower or
    seen a horse-mare in many years. Because juvenile vocabulary has
    lots of concrete words, I once picked up a dictionary intended for
    Junior High School students to browse for words– it's buried somewhere
    around here …and I know where.. just don't want to bother.)

    I have been very impressed lately with what people have done with
    these systems, typically getting some news media through
    memory competitions, such as the person your link goes to.

    If you want to read some about the educational theory of the middle
    ages, and memory systems, and all sorts of wonderfully mentally
    stimulating ideas– Francis B. Yates "The Art of Memory" I found
    to be a very interesting book about memory systems.

    Richard Harper

    On Tue, Nov 18, 2008 at 4:32 PM, MICHAEL_LISITSA
    wrote:
    > New Message on Gregg Shorthand
    >
    > Number consonant chart
    >
    > Reply
    > Reply to Sender Recommend Message 1 in Discussion
    > From: MICHAEL_LISITSA
    > Here's an interesting chart linking consonants to numbers in an aid to
    > create mnemonic devices. You have to scroll around half way down the page.
    >
    > http://userpage.fu-berlin.de/~tanguay/memory_main.htm
    >
    > I find the concept really interesting, and I can imagine after a while it
    > could really become second nature (like shorthand) but I'm not too happy
    > with the 'r' being there. 'r' is not a stable consonant, especially when it
    > is used at the end of words like "care" or "par". You can also see that the
    > sounds are paired phonetically with their soft counterparts just like in
    > Gregg (eg. p,b f,v sh,ch,,j t,d s,z).
    >
    > Michael.
    >
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