Milestone Met

It’s rather a small one, but slow and occasionally steady is better than stopped. I finished Simplified Assignment 12 at 60wpm. (Each chapter has 6 assignments, each assignment has 6 passages, and none go to St. Ives.)

Now to read the next assignment, including cold-reads of the plates until they’re up to speed, then create dictation files.

I’m creating a full set of dictation files and putting them on my site as I go. The quality is okay for a free file you listen to only a few times. What speeds would a new student need for each chapter, including overclocking? It’s easier to add a few more speeds on the first pass than to go back and add them later.

(by
Cricket for everyone)

12 comments Add yours
  1. Thanks!

    GreggStudent: You might manage faster. You're doing Anni, right?

    Carlos: Does your set of tapes have beginner speeds synched to the manual? The ones I see up so far start at 80wpm.

    My grand dream is a full set of dictation files for all the manuals, for the speeds needed at that stage. (We don't need 30wpm for the final chapters, nor do we need 90wpm for the first few.)

    If GreggStudent (or any one else) sends me recordings at his target speed for each passage as he needs them (well, a week or two in advanced because I'm not that organized) I can create a set with some speeds on either side of the target and add them to the library.

    Cricket

  2. Actually, I do have those tapes, cricket, but I haven't transferred those to MP3 yet. I need to connect the reel-to-reel to the computer, and I'm waiting to get a better PC interface, which should be in the market soon.

    I believe the Simplified reels start at 70 wpm.

  3. Hey cricket. I'm studying Anniversary, but progress has been bit slower for me than for most here I think. It's only been this year that the big breakthroughs have started, and I had to work at it for a while.

    I'm wrapping up my fourth trip through the Manual and the third through the Functional Method. The saving grace for me is that I absolutely love studying and practicing Dr. Gregg's system, so it's been easy to persevere.

    I can read with relative ease now, and my outlines are okay and steadily improving. But dictation is still a somewhat daunting pursuit. It'll come though. And (to put it mildly) I have ambitious goals—namely, beating Swem & Dupraw. 😮

    Anyway, it's always encouraging to be reminded that among the few of us remaining, it's still onwards and upwards! 🙂

  4. Last night a big group broke into smaller groups for discussion. I got chosen to summarize and report when we rejoined after dinner. I'll blame tiredness, because if it weren't for the few key words I put in longhand I would have had to sound out each outline. Looks like I need to spend more time reading my own writing. Sigh.

  5. Thanks, Chief! I'll take this as marching orders. 🙂 At least as soon as I get through the last few chapters of the Manual.

    Fortunately, I have the Functional Method Dictation and the key (and Godwilling, next year, everyone else here will, too.) I have the original Gregg Speed Building (and the key) but not the one for colleges (yet.) And I don't yet have the Bowman book.

    My current curriculum for this round through the Manual has been as follows:
    Manual unit—read and write all outlines and exercises.
    Functional Method—relevant assignments.
    Fundamental Drills—relevant exercises.
    5,000 Most-Used Shorthand Forms—Write all outlines per unit.
    And once a whole chapter is completed:

    Gregg Speed Studies—for the Manual chapter
    Graded Readings—for the Manual chapter
    This has worked very well for my current round! (I've been using the original Anniversary Speed Studies, as I don't yet have the 3rd edition.)

    Incidentally, after reviewing a past thread, and re-reading Philip's remarks about Expert Shorthand Speed Course last week, I checked amazon.com and found a copy available for ten bucks. [duck fast!] It's everything he said it was. I thought it would be impossible to find the key, but after checking on the world library catalog I found only two entries, one of which was the University of Pittsburgh library. And as I happen to live in the suburbs of Pittsburgh …

    Meanwhile, I've been scanning and prep-ing a special doc to post, and I'm almost done. This one will be "unique"—assuming no one else has heard of the "McCann Method." 🙂

  6. At this stage, you should consider studying from a dictation and a speed building book. The dictation book provides additional vocabulary to reinforce your reading ability. The speed building book will help you refresh theory and increase your dictation speed little by little. I recommend the Functional Method Dictation by Louis Leslie and Shorthand Dictation Studies (2d. edition, 1947) by Wallace Bowman for the dictation books, and Gregg Speed Building for Colleges by JR Gregg, Revised Edition (1943) for speed building.

  7. At this stage, you should consider studying from a dictation and a speed building book. The dictation book provides additional vocabulary to reinforce your reading ability. The speed building book will help you refresh theory and increase your dictation speed little by little. I recommend the Functional Method Dictation by Louis Leslie and Shorthand Dictation Studies (2d. edition, 1947) by Wallace Bowman for the dictation books, and Gregg Speed Building for Colleges by JR Gregg, (Revised Edition,1943) for speed building.

  8. The plan you followed is perfectly fine as a review. Your shorthand knowledge needs to be challenged now. That's where the additional books come into place. They will expose you to new phrases and new vocabulary, plus they will help you increase your shorthand speed. For example, take the first letter of the Functional Dictation Method. Every two or three outlines of that letter is a phrase: some of them you may have seen before, some others maybe not. The good thing is that the outlines will be repeated throughout the book, so they will eventually become second nature.

    Also, any of the Gregg Speed Building books is good enough to be honest. The one I suggested contains the most practice material. But if you're getting the first edition with the key, that's really good too.

    Which version of the Expert Shorthand book did you get? Hopefully you got the Anniversary version, because the original version (which I believe is on Google books) has zero shorthand. I have the key for the Expert Shorthand Book. But before you do the expert shorthand, you need to do the speed building and dictation books, mostly because it will assume that your vocabulary, word building ability, and dictation is strong enough to handle the additional shortcuts and more specialized material. I wouldn't tackle the expert book unless you can write comfortably between 100-120 wpm. Notice that the dictation files that I posted on the site that contain congressional record passages (expert material) start at 120 wpm.

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