A Message for New Members

Welcome to the group!

If you have joined the group recently, please introduce yourself so that we know who you are and why are you interested in Gregg Shorthand. I have received many requests for joining in the last month or so, and although I have approved them, unfortunately I have seen very few new members participating in the discussion, or lurking in the posts. Be aware that inactivity in the group for a year (which means to have not even read a message) will get you dropped from the members list. Of course, you can always rejoin. Feel free to roam around.

New Announcement: Starting March 2017, we moved from Blogger to WordPress. As before, only people that have sent me a request to join by clicking on the “About, Contact” option on the menu, have access to the documents and can initiate posts.

Note: Starting September 2012, we moved from Multiply to the Blogger platform. As a consequence,
only people that have registered with me through Multiply as explained in this post, or that have sent me a request to join by clicking on the “About, Contact” option on the menu, have access to the documents and can initiate posts.

(Due to a bug in Blogger’s threaded commenting system, posts do not show more than 200 comments. For that reason, the original post was duplicated here and comments in that post have been closed.)

103 comments Add yours
  1. Comment by Samuel Weiss, August 19, 2015 at 8:48 PM.

    Hi everyone,

    I'm Sam. I found my Mom's old Diamond Jubilee books many years ago, and ever since then I have been casually interested in Gregg Shorthand. Recently I decided that I want to try to learn Gregg Shorthand well so that I can use it to easily take notes in grad school. I decided to try the Anniversary edition because I might as well go all out if I'm going to spend my time and effort on this endeavor.

    So far I have been using the original Anniversary book, but I just bought the two book Functional Method set because I have read a lot of good things about them. I also have a few issues of The Gregg Writer. Maybe I will try scanning them and uploading them here if anyone is interested.

    My mom used to be a secretary, but she hasn't used shorthand in years. Since I've become more interested in shorthand, I have gotten her interested in the subject again. Surprisingly, she still remembers most of the system after all of these years. She is now working through her old books as review.

    Anyway, this site appears to have a lot of useful material, and I hope to add to the discussions here when I can.

  2. Comment by Susan, August 19, 2015 at 3:37 AM.

    Welcome Sam. I too have started on the journey of learning the Anniversary version of Gregg shorthand. At Carlos' suggestion, I started with the Functional Method books. I have not gotten very far yet, but I am enjoying it thoroughly.

    When I was in high school in the early 1960s, they must have been teaching Gregg Simplified but I never took any shorthand classes. I wish I had !!!

    Enjoy the journey. There is lots of great information here and Carlos and others can answer any questions that come up along the way.

    You'll also find that once you get started you will be looking on eBay for lots of other great Anniversary Gregg shorthand books to supplement your original manual and the Functional Manuals. For me, it has become a bit of an addiction and I have built up quite a library of them 🙂 For the most part, they are readily available on eBay and reasonably priced. I haven't paid more than $10 for any of them and most have been more like $5 or $6 or $7…….

    1. Comment by Samuel Weiss, August 20, 2015 at 2:40 PM.

      Thanks for the welcome. I am already finding myself addicted to looking for supplementary material on eBay. Already I have the original Anniversary manual, the two Functional Method books, the phrase book, Gregg Speed Studies, Speed Studies and Grading Readings combo book, and three issues of The Gregg Writer. I won't count my Mom's Diamond Jubilee books because I don't use them. I've promised myself I won't get any more until I've made some significant headway into what I already have. 🙂

    2. Comment by Susan, August 21, 2015 at 4:39 AM.

      Hi Sam,

      You have made some good choices in books. I highly recommend 5000 Most Used Shorthand Forms. It is organized according to the chapters in the Anni Manual. There are several other books that are organized according to the manual – like Graded Readings and Speed Studies.

      BTW, Carlos recommends Gregg Speed Studies – Third Edition.

      I suggest that you look in the archives at the Dec 03, 2008 post that Carlos made called Gregg Shorthand Book Covers. In that post you will find a pdf that shows many of the most important books arranged by Gregg series i.e. Pre-Anniversary, Anniversary, etc.

      There are also some pdfs available for the keys to some of the books and for some books that are difficult to find used.

      There is a pdf of the Teachers Manual for the Anniversary Functional Method Manuals that I have found very helpful as I work through the Functional Method books.

      I can't remember where I found the pdf of the Teachers Manual, but I'm sure Carlos remembers….. or I can do a search and see if I can find it for you.

    3. Comment by Samuel Weiss, August 26, 2015 at 7:45 PM.

      Thanks, Susan. For now, I am going to use the online edition of 5000 Most Used Shorthand Forms on Angelfishy's site. I am waiting for a cheap copy to appear on eBay before getting it.

      Why exactly is the third edition recommended? I have the version from the Graded Reading and Speed Studies combo. One of my eBay orders gave me an extra copy of just the Speed Studies part as well. Is there really that big of a difference?

      Thanks for mentioning the teacher's manual. I will look over it when I get the chance.

    4. Sam, the difference with the third edition of Gregg Speed Studies (GSS) is that the book is correlated with the units of the manual, so once you finish a unit, you can study to the corresponding unit in GSS, being easier to follow. The previous editions were not organized that way and you had to navigate your way through the book. Don't worry though; since you have the second edition of GSS, you can use both editions — I did that when I was learning the system and it provided extra practice.

    5. Thanks, Carlos. I am in the process of reading the first 21 assignments from the Functional Method manual, so I have some time before I would need the third edition. When the time comes, I will take your advice and get a copy of the third edition. I plan to work through the Functional Method manual, the Anniversary manual, Speed Studies, Graded Readings, 5000 Most Used Shorthand Forms, Progressive Exercises, and possibly some other reading material in parallel after I am fluent in reading the first 21 assignments. I feel that even though this will take me longer than just going through the FM manual, I will get a more thorough practice and understanding of each assignment.

  3. Comment by Steven Bhardwaj, August 25, 2015 at 3:22 PM.

    Hi All:

    Thanks Carlos for the invite and to everyone for adding to such a vibrant community!

    I am learning Anniversary for myself and because I want to teach it to my forthcoming child.

    For myself, I am a language buff and enjoy improving my proficiency in Chinese, Spanish, French, and learning new languages like ASL. Gregg falls into this category, and I hope it may even accelerate my learning speeds.

    For my family, my wife and I are expecting a child due soon, on September 1! I had been practicing Plover (stenotype), and was thinking about how and when we might teach the child stenotype. But then I had the idea that if I teach a very young child to read shorthand at a very young age, then they will also be able to write shorthand. I hope to teach the child (of surprise gender) Gregg starting from a young age, by reading to him/her from Gregg books, and using "Early Learning" methods. (e.g.: http://www.brillbaby.com/).

    Right now, I'm at Unit 21 in Anni, and have been following along reading the essays in the Fundamental Drills. I haven't started writing yet, I figure I'll start that soon, maybe after Unit 24 or so. I purchased the Functional Method book, I think I'll read through that before I start writing.

    I'm super excited to read all the materials. I tried to read a little of Alice in Wonderland without comparing it to a typescript copy – still way over my head! Confident I'll get there though!

    Cheers,

    Steven

    1. Wonderful story Steven, welcome to the blog, and congratulations on the arrival of the new baby! Once the baby is born, you have to write the baby's name in shorthand! That will be your first shorthand writing assignment, :-).

    2. Welcome, Steven! I'll be curious to see your teaching adventures with your child in the years to come. My kids are ages 13 and 9– so far I'm only teaching the 13-year old the notehand edition of Gregg. I plan to start my 9-year old next summer, when her spelling skills are a little more solidified (I'm afraid teaching her shorthand at this point might mess up her spelling). I believe Gregg began teaching children as young as 6th grade, if I'm remembering right. I'd certainly be fascinated to read about teaching children shorthand even younger than that. I hope you'll share your experiences! Congrats on your new baby!

  4. Comment by Connie Chadwell, August 28, 2015 at 7:41 AM.

    Hi everyone – I'm Connie. I am so grateful to you, Carlos, for this shorthand blog – it's just great! I studied Gregg Simplified – probably the last year that version was taught – in college and have used it every day since. The other day, two of my granddaughters saw me using it and were fascinated, so I taught them a few symbols. Just purchased the Refresher Course in Gregg Shorthand and am so glad I did – it is really helpful. Thank you, Carlos, for your work in the shorthand community!

    1. Thank you Connie, and welcome to the blog! It's nice that your granddaughters showed interest in shorthand. That's exactly how I first showed interest, by looking at my aunt writing it, and it always fascinated me. She had beautiful penmanship too (very similar to Mrs. Richmond's). Hopefully, they will also pick it up some day!

    2. Welcome Connie !!! I graduated from high school in 1963, so I have to assume that they were teaching Gregg Simplified. Unfortunately, I never took any of the shorthand classes. I wish I had.

      So here I am at the age of 70 attempting to learn Anniversary shorthand on my own. I wouldn't even have attempted it without this blog. Everyone here is friendly, supportive and knowledgeable.

      Enjoy !!! Susan

  5. Hi, my name is Monica and thank you Carlos for including me in the group and for creating this wonderful website with so much helpful information about learning Gregg shorthand. I learned shorthand 43 years ago when I was in secretarial school and I recently found an old copy of my Diamond Jubilee Gregg Shorthand book in my bookcase. I started reading through it and I was amazed that I could still read some of the passages. I remembered how much I enjoyed studying shorthand in the past so I recently began studying it on a daily basis again. I take classes now and then and it would be so helpful to be able to take notes in shorthand again. This is also great work to keep your brain active as they say people who keep their minds busy with studies can avoid dementia and I'm getting up there in age 🙂 It is wonderful to have a place to go to share our experiences and ask questions while studying. Thanks again to Carlos for creating this group and all the hard work that must go into it.

    1. Welcome Monica. I am attempting to learn Anniversary Gregg on my own (with the help of Carlos and other members of this blog) for 2 main reasons:

      1) I have always thought that Gregg shorthand looked like fun… and it is !!

      2) To stave off dementia (I'm 70). I think it's working 🙂

      Enjoy the journey !!

  6. Hello everyone,

    I'd like to introduce myself to the group. I recently came across the art of shorthand (yes, I think of it as an art) by way of Howard Wallace's videos. I am a new learner to simplified Gregg shorthand and have a goal of dictating my work/chart notes without losing my train of thought waiting for my hand writing to catch up. I'm in the healthcare profession and was wondering if there are any like minded individuals that are or have used Gregg's shorthand to write treatment notes for patients. If so, reply back! I look forward to using the resources here to hasten my learning. Thanks to Carlos for a great site. Cheers. Garin

    1. Welcome to the forum Garin. Glad you had a chance to look at my videos. If they are like elementary school, this forum is like graduate school. Here there are many scholars with different, but well thought out, viewpoints.

      You probably already know the approach I advocate. If you have a good grounding in the phonetic alphabet and the abbreviating principle you have everything you need to take notes. However, it can make life easier to have access to a set of already thought out abbreviations. At the end of my introductory videos I pointed viewers to the Anniversary dictionary. You won't necessarily find specialized medical vocabulary there. However, some Gregg medical dictionaries have been published. Two on my shelves are "Gregg Medical Manual and Dictionary" by Smither, and "Gregg Medical Shorthand Dictionary" by Byers. You may be able to pick one of these up on the second hand market.

      My wife is also a medical professional. I know there is a big push towards electronic medical records these days, and many providers are entering their primary notes electronically. Many don't care for the electronic systems but in trying to work efficiently they shun an extra step of creating paper notes which would then have to be retyped into the electronic system. How do you plan to use Gregg? How are you going to integrate with the electronic systems? I'm very curious if Gregg still has utility for the medical profession outside of transcribing lecture notes and meeting notes.

  7. Hello. I'm retired and just started learning Gregg to keep the mind active and frankly it's easier on my arthritic hands – probably from spending my life on a keyboard of one type or another. Also I don't have to haul out te laptop every time I want to make a note. I bought the Gregg simplified Second edition because that is what is available. I'm looking for the answer key which I think is called Student Transcript but I don't have the ISBN. Anyway, glad to find this group, and to know I'm not the only one out there trying to learn this. Thanks for letting me join.

    1. Welcome, Checkers3. I'm a fan of the Simplified version of Gregg although I don't study as diligently as I should.

      The student's transcript for the Simplified second edition can sometimes be found from used book sellers on eBay and Amazon but you have to be very careful to get the second edition instead of the first. Sometimes this is hard because of poor descriptions. I don't think it has ever been reprinted during the ISBN era so it may not have an ISBN.

      If you have questions about any particular exercise in the book feel free to start a new message thread or piggyback on one of the existing threads about Simplified. People here will be glad to assist.

    2. Welcome checkers3! You'll find shorthand enjoyable and if you have any questions about any outline, just post it here. Sometimes one doesn't get something at a first read, but if you come back to it later, more than likely you will get it.

  8. Hi,
    I'm a high school student and I remembered seeing gregg in an old book case at my aunt's house that her mother had given her from when she was in school. It was pre anniversary, but at the time I had no idea that there were different versions. After I left I always had it in the back of my mind and tried to learn some in middle school from gregg.angelfish but i guess i didn't see the benefit. But now, I've gotten back into it, and I'm learning simplified with some borrowed anniversary ideas for speed, since I find that anniversary, though more complicated, has many many good principles that can be at least borrowed. Anyway, I'm still only at about 70 wpm and I'm looking forward to learning a lot more about this system and I'm of course very glad that I found it at all.
    I think gregg is by far the most beautiful, Teeline is pretty ugly and so is pitman, though I'll be the first to admit that pitman can match gregg for speed and accuracy, though i think it's just nonsense that gregg gets impossible to read over time. That's only the case, as I've read, if you make hastily and poorly formed outlines that are not based of the principles or ingrained in your use.
    Anyway, I think that Simplified is a great place to start, and that the later systems are just not as good as ann, pre, and simp, though they are all faster than longhand by quite a bit. Feel free to give your opinion on that, and I'll see you all in the posts!
    Thanks to Carlos for making this great blog

    1. Awesome greggislife! A speed 70 wpm is awesome for a first course, especially since you're just starting to write. I can still read notes taken a long time ago, without remembering the context of the original speech.

  9. Greetings all,

    My name is Tynitra. I have been interested in learning shorthand for a few years and decided to begin to study in earnest this month, so that I can increase the speed in which I take notes at the office.

    I own the "Gregg Shorthand Manual Simplified, Second Edition" and was searching the Internet for tools to aid in practicing what I am learning when I happened upon this site. I am most grateful to be included in the Gregg Group, and look forward to using the resources provided and reading the posts. Cheers.

  10. My name is Kevin and I got interested a few years ago from an old book of my mom's. I think it was simplified but don't have it with me currently. I thought it was fascinating and went all the way through it. I got away from it and am taking it up again. I downloaded a pdf anniversary manual a few days ago and am simply refreshing my knowledge and getting reading practice as well. I'm not writing much–I just want to get fast at reading–then I'll practice writing more.
    I stumbled onto this blog looking for miscellaneous stuff to read. I want this to be practical as well as a hobby, but if it takes ten times longer to read back to yourself what you wrote, it's not very useful. So I just want to read some every night for a while and progress from there.
    I'm glad to have found this group and it looks like Gregg might be making quite a comeback.

    1. Welcome Kevin! Someone said once that reading is the be-all and end-all in shorthand, and it is very true. Reading a lot of well-written shorthand is the best activity to do improve writing speed and to improve the legibility in your notes. Correctly executed shorthand outlines will be retained in your brain, avoiding any hesitation in writing.

      If you are interested in pursuing Anniversary, the best books to study is the two-volume Gregg Shorthand Functional Method set (Parts 1 and 2) by Louis Leslie, which provides ample reading material. With the FM manual, you won't be writing any shorthand until you have studied 21 lessons, which should give you enough exposure to well written shorthand before attempting to write a single stroke. Another option for you is to get the third edition of Gregg Speed Studies, which provides even more material for you to read. You can get these books on eBay cheaply.

  11. Welcome Kevin. It's interesting that you keyed in on reading speed. There are a number of us here interested in approaches that are slower to write but faster to read, like Greghand, Notehand, and the first editions of Gregg. Simplified did move in that same direction from Aniversary. If you made it all the way through a simplified text you have a great foundation!

  12. Hello, my name is Mary and I took Gregg shorthand in a Secretarial course many years ago. I didn't finish the shorthand class, but when I saw my textbook online, I purchased it, and found that I still remembered many of the forms. Working at a non-profit, where people call seeking assistance, it's good to be able to take down their stories quickly, w/out losing any details. It's also good to have it be unreadable to others, as shorthand usually is to most people, for the sake of confidentiality. Finding this website was wonderful, I didn't know anyone else out there was still interested in shorthand! I look forward to listening and learning from all of you here, as I continue to practice my shorthand daily (slowly but surely!).

  13. Hello everyone! My name is Janet and I would like to introduce myself. My practical reason for becoming interested in Gregg Shorthand was for taking notes for an online course in which the teacher talked way too fast. It soon became clear that this was not something I could learn in a few weeks, so I changed my immediate goal to reading the Monday Mirth jokes and cartoons in shorthand on Daily Gregg. I concentrated on the readings in the first 54 chapters in the Simplified Manual, which contain all the theory. Now I am starting at the beginning of the book again, this time doing the writing exercises. I'm looking forward to reading more of the Simplified reading material on this site.

    Another reason for learning Gregg Shorthand – it intrigues me. I like the symbols and the beauty of Gregg Shorthand. I have also been interested in other writing systems, including learning some Sanskrit with the Devanagari alphabet and also the Tibetan alphabet along with a small vocabulary.

    As a child I saw the value of shorthand as a secret code – my mother used it for her Christmas gift lists.

    Thanks to Carlos and contributors to the Gregg Group – your posts and comments have been a great resource and inspiration while learning.

  14. Hello everyone. My name is Brenda and I have recently decided to refresh my shorthand skills after…let's see…48 years? YIKES, has it been that long?

    I learned Gregg shorthand in high school. Looking through books that are available to purchase now, I think it must have been the Diamond Jubilee edition I learned from originally. I have now bought a few different editions and am just playing around at a slow but steady pace until I decide which edition I want to focus on.

    I probably won't post much here, but I will enjoy seeing what other have to say.

    Carlos, thank you for allowing me to join.

    1. Yes, Diamond Jubilee was first published in 1963, so if you were in high school in the late 60s (as I was) Diamond Jubilee would have been the version you used. My advice would be to stick with DJS . . . the advantages of switching to one of the other versions are minimal. And lots of DJS materials are still available. Check Ebay, abe.com, and Amazon.

  15. Hi everyone, I'm new here and an absolute beginner at shorthand. I suffer from RSI, which makes it hard to take notes above a very slow pace, both in longhand and typing.

    Being able to write extensively and quickly is important to me, as a life coach and with wanting to get an active blog happening – being able to draft and play with ideas quickly will be valuable, as well as taking notes during talks and seminars.

    I've started experimenting with Gregg shorthand, and it seems really helpful. So far, I've only read the angelfishy site and started the Anki deck. Next I intend to start practice each morning.

  16. Hello, everyone. My name is Jesse. I'm an enthusiast of constructed writing systems and spelling reforms, and also a collector of Gregg shorthand stuff. I own the manuals for pre-Anniversary, Anniversary, Simplified, and Diamond Jubilee, but I spend most of my time with Simplified. I don't have any particular need to write quickly; I almost never even write longhand on paper anymore. But I do enjoy reading and writing such an attractive and relatively practical neography.

  17. I first studied shorthand in the mid 1980's using Series 90 at a local community college, but dropped out of the class halfway through. Got married, four children, busy life…tried picking shorthand studies up again in the late 1990's, but Series 90 is not great, which I didn't know at the time. In recent years, I've bought many used shorthand books; Anniversary, Simplified, Diamond, Centennial. Finally decided to use Centennial to start, and most of the way through Book 1. Why study at this point in time? Several reasons: to finish something I started long ago, I find it relaxing, it's a great way to journal with little chance of anyone being able to read, and I like the oddity of it in this day and age of electronics. I'm excited to use this website and blog to enhance my studies!

  18. Greetings. My interest in shorthand is borne out of my slow, illegible handwriting and my workplace need to take information conveyed orally. I currently do my text composition on a computer since my typing skills far outdo my poor handwriting, but would love to transition to pen-on-paper writing to avoid the distractions of the computer.

    I found this blog while gathering information on various shorthand systems. I opt for Gregg for the following reasons: The availability of a German and a well-developed French adaptation led me to consider it alongside the major German systems of DEK and Stolze-Schrey and the French systems of Duployé, Delauney-Prévost, and Aimé-Paris. Unlike seemingly many other people, I process language and tend to write phonetically rather than by spelling. Gregg can be written using the ballpoint pens and unlined paper available at work, unlike Pitman, Stolze-Schrey, or DEK which feature line thickness and/or position relative to the baseline. Gregg’s design based the motions of actual handwriting appeals to me aesthetically over the geometrical forms of Pitman and the French systems.

    I have begun learning the Anniversary edition. My library contains SV Greenberg’s adaptation to German (1924) and RJ Sénécal’s French adaptation of Anniversary (Sténographie Gregg, 2nd edition, 1939) along with a volume of speed exercises (Études graduées de vitesse en sténographie Gregg, FA Lippman, 1938).

    Thank you Carlos for admitting me to this blog. Thank you all for posting so much useful and interesting information and creating this motivating environment.

  19. Hi all! I happy to have found a group of people that share the love for shorthand. I first heard about it from my grandfather. He always tells a story about how he tried to copy a girl’s notes while in college but he couldn't because they were in shorthand. After he told me the story for the 100th time I decided to see what short hand really was. And it was love at first sight. Since then I have been working mostly out of a high-school text book on the centennial edition of gregg shorthand, both of the functional method books, and a diamond jubilee book as well. I'm still very much a beginner and I'm currently focused on being able to read shorthand. Once I’m confident and can read fluently I plan on working on my writing skills. Thanks for all the materials on this site and I look forward to chatting with some of you in the future.

  20. You might want to focus on one of the systems to start with. You mention Centennial, Diamond Jubilee, and I assume your functional method books are Anniversary. Even though the basic theory is the same, there are differences among the different versions.

    1. Yea…. I was kind of thinking that. Will it make that big of a difference? I just thought that as long as i'm learning to read it that I will be OK.
      Currently, the main thing i'm having trouble with is the "h" sounds. Its not always indicated in the practice exercises. For example the words "her" or "him".

  21. Hi all! I am new to shorthand, but find the concept fascinating. I have always suffered from slow, poor handwriting, and so began typing early in my school years. Shorthand was still taught when I was in high school, but I never took it, not realizing how useful it might have been to me in college or in my later career.

    I am also interested in the written form of languages: in college and grad school I studied Greek, Sanskrit, and Tibetan – none of which use the Latin alphabet (and, in the case of Tibetan at least, makes even greater use of historical spelling that diverges from pronunciation than English). Gregg, with its phonemic emphasis seems like a welcome departure. So, for me, learning some form of Gregg will be more of a hobby than a practical tool (not that I do not look forward to being able to make use of the practical benefits of being able to write faster!)

    Secondarily I am considering teaching my kids some form of shorthand (or rather learning along with them). We live in a fairly remote part of Alaska and where we homeschool our kids. My oldest has mastered the Getty-Dubay method of italic handwriting, and it is very beautiful, but his speed is relatively slow, and I suspect, would not serve him well for note taking, etc.

    I have not yet bought any books, but I do have a PDF of the anniversary edition that I briefly flipped through. Notehand seems like it might be perfect for teaching my kids, but there does not seem to be much material available. For me, Anniversary seems appealing, at least just as an exercise. Is it possible to start with Notehand and then proceed on to another system?

    1. Welcome John! I'm glad you've decided to learn Gregg.

      If you haven't done so, make sure you have read this post which contains a document that outlines the different series of Gregg.

      The question about which one choose is very personal. It is always possible to start with any series and change, and many people have done so successfully. However, I discourage changing in the middle of learning one series, because you'll be spending time relearning. It is better to stick with one series while learning, finish that series, and once you've finished, then learn additional series if you like. You'll always have that initial series you learned at least as a base to rely on.

      In general, the further apart the Gregg series are in time, the more difficult is to switch to a faster version of Gregg (such as Anniversary or earlier) because of the learning curve. For example, trying to switch from Notehand to Anniversary is possible but you'll be learning a lot of new principles, whereas changing from DJS to Simplified shouldn't be much of an issue.

      For these reasons, why not try Simplified Gregg? It is a series right in the middle, not difficult to learn, and there is plenty of material to read, and the books are readily available. The only issue I have with Simplified is the awful amount of business letters, but they have some non-business-related material in the reading practice as well.

      If Anniversary still ticks your fancy, I don't recommend using the regular manual because it doesn't have enough practice material. The two-volume set of Gregg Shorthand Functional Method by Louis Leslie would be the way to go. Here is a post about the FM books, my answer is just below the question (written as "chuck MSN").

      If you have any more questions, just post them here.

    2. You certainly can begin with Notehand and then go on to another edition if you feel you need to (for speed or otherwise), though keep in mind the other editions of Gregg shorthand will be business-oriented. As such, the texts get rather dull. Notehand is the least abbreviated version of any of the Gregg shorthand systems.

      I'm a homeschooling parent, too. I've actually been creating materials in Notehand for my kids. I started teaching my son Notehand a year ago (he's 14 now), and I just started teaching my daughter (age 10) last month. I've actually been creating Notehand materials, including dictation recordings (the first 21 lessons from the text are completed so far). Sometimes I think about starting a Notehand blog.

      Here are the links to some of the things I've created for Notehand:

      Notehand Bingo: https://greggshorthand.blogspot.com/2016/08/notehand-bingo.html

      Gregg Notehand Textual Dictionary:
      https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzEhH8xFRZN7M1JFVmlzSm5aRVE/view

      Notehand Brief Forms cheat sheet:
      https://greggshorthand.blogspot.com/2015/05/notehand-brief-form-common-phrases-with.html

      I've scanned in a couple of the Notehand workbooks that are out-of-print and hard to get a hold of, too:

      Essentials of Gregg Notehand: Intensive Theory & Practice: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzEhH8xFRZN7SW4tRWp4UXZNVWM/view

      Practical Drills & Notemaking Exercises for Gregg Notehand: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzEhH8xFRZN7b2VTUXVRTFhQekk/view

      Teacher's Guide to Notehand:
      https://greggshorthand.blogspot.com/2015/05/teachers-guide-for-gregg-notehand-1960.html

      I also created a chart for teachers comparing the 3 Notehand texts:
      https://greggshorthand.blogspot.com/2015/11/comparison-of-various-notehand-editions.html

      Welcome! (By the way, we used Getty-Dubay for writing, too!)

    3. Thanks Carlos and Teri!

      It is good to know others are also treading the same path. Those Notehand resources will be of great use and I will certainly check out the other series, as Carlos suggests, as well.

  22. Personal opinion, I think Notehand is a great choice for kids. The memory burden is lighter than the regular versions of Gregg, and the goal is practical note taking rather than business use. Notehand was my first classroom introduction to shorthand (back in the 1960s), and after that I took regular shorthand (DJS). The exercises and reading materials for Notehand are a bit more interesting and useful for younger students. There's no reason for them to be thinking about business applications of shorthand since those practically don't exist today.

    If you can find it, there is also the Gregg Shorthand Junior Manual from the 1920s, which also had the same goal. It was the early precursor to Notehand, and was aimed at junior high school students. PDF is here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzEhH8xFRZN7YlNwQ2ItTjdURlk/view (thanks to Teri). I really like the simplicity and presentation.

    I learned italic handwriting and know the Getty-Dubay method well. Because fountain pens and dip pens aren't practical any more, it's important to focus on the monoline forms for the alphabet. Younger writers have to be prepared to pick up a ballpoint pen or gel pen and write with it, and not feel constrained by the thicks and thins of broad pen writing. The "calligraphic" emphasis is why systems like this never gained wide popularity. The monoline forms of italic handwriting are immensely useful.

    However, if you're using regular handwriting, it doesn't matter if it's Zaner-Bloser, Palmer style, D'Nealian, Getty-Dubay, or any other–it's all going to be too slow for really rapid writing.

    1. Just a small correction. Although the GS Junior Manual was geared towards junior high students, it is still a full presentation of Gregg Shorthand (in this case, 1916 Pre-Anniversary), so it is not really a simplified version of Gregg like Notehand is. You will be learning all the brief forms.

      Just to be aware, Notehand is a system for taking notes, as the book describes. In a classroom situation, where you are listening and taking down what someone is saying, Gregg Shorthand would be much better.

      Lastly, about the practice material in Notehand, while it contains non-business-related material, a good portion of the book is still business related. So you will still be reading letters about balance overdue payments and insurance policies, and selections about making profit (not a bad thing, I may add).

  23. Thanks for the invite, Carlos!

    I became interested in Gregg Shorthand during my quest to find an efficient way of writing words. I tried it on and off during the summer, and found it quite fun! There's something beautiful in the flow of Gregg shorthand. It also has the added bonus of using less strokes than conventional handwriting, being the lazy person that I am. I'm hoping to reach the level at which I can read Gregg like English. That'd be immensely useful in preparation for university.

    I've stuck with Gregg Simplified, although I started with Anniversary. I mainly use the resources from Open Library. I am pretty comfortable with the alphabet, and have memorized some common short forms. Writing isn't natural to me yet. Other than that, I'm not so good at reading Gregg, so I'll be checking out the cool articles Carlos has posted.

    Cheers, Yujin.

  24. I've always been interested in writing systems of all kinds. At various times of my life (starting in childhood) I've studied Morse code, semaphore, the Hebrew and Cyrillic alphabets, the Japanese syllabary and (to a lesser extent) other characters, and Braille. I learned to type before the days of computers, years before any of my friends did—and then was thrilled in later years to learn about Dvorak, which I happily switched to!

    The first time I thought about shorthand was in 1987 at age 21 when I read a book called Emergence by David Palmer. The main character keeps a journal in Pitman shorthand, which she highly recommends over Gregg.

    This got me interested, and I checked a Pitman book out of the library. But I found the thick-and-thin aspect of it difficult; it made my hands tense and I lost interest. At the same time, I began to doubt Palmer's expertise, since another quirk of the character's journal was that she left off words like "a" for being wasteful of time and space—but those words seemed so little wasteful in shorthand that it made me question whether Palmer had any experience in shorthand himself. I abandoned the whole pursuit.

    Soon afterwards, I noticed a school secretary making notes in Gregg. I'd never seen shorthand in the wild before. (This would have been about 1990.) I was jealous of her ability!

    A few years later, I took my baby to the library to escape our unairconditioned apartment. Browsing in the stacks, I discovered Gregg shorthand. I didn't check the books out; I may have been concerned that if I had them at home they would distract me from my child, or I may have been embarrassed to be studying such a thing (though I'm not sure why), so I sat at a desk in the library studying it with the baby sleeping in a stroller beside me. I am pretty sure we spent a number of summer afternoons that way.

    Life went on, without much shorthand, but eventually I picked up a shorthand book or two that I found at a used bookstore. Not knowing the differences between editions, I was surprised by the different outlines taught, but that didn't slow me down much.

    In 2000, when my third child was born, I was in my second phase of interest in shorthand. I remember rocking him in his room at night, writing shorthand in my head. But soon afterwards I became discouraged because although I could write shorthand at an encouraging rate of speed, I often couldn't read my own note, though I could read the manuals just fine. Clearly I wasn't making the outlines properly, but it wasn't clear how I could improve, and didn't seem worthwhile. I got rid of my books.

    Now, having discovered the wonderful resources available online, I am back, studying Anniversary. (I believe my previous resources were DJ and Simplified.) I chose this because I enjoy learning systems like this, so simplicity doesn't attract me that much (and honestly, it doesn't seem that much more difficult), and because I know the value of large amounts of reading material. I am thrilled to be able to read in shorthand!

    I've been startled at the speed with which reading has helped me. I haven't done a lot of writing yet, but after I'd spent just one or two sessions reading, outlines would spring almost fully-formed into my head when I thought about shorthand. I don't even think of myself as very visually oriented, but the reading is clearly helping.

    I'm also a teacher of Spanish and German, and my quick improvement when reading shorthand has reinforced my belief that lots of reading, beginning early, is important for my students.

    1. What a fantastic story! Welcome to the blog, Beth!

      A small recommendation: if you want to really get good in Anniversary, you should get the two-volume set (Parts 1 and 2) titled Gregg Shorthand Functional Method by Louis Leslie, if you don't have it already. This set of books is for the most part correlated with the Anniversary manual; however, it has a lot more reading and writing material, and the key for most of the assignments is in the back. Right now, you can get it on eBay for really cheap!

    2. Talk about a memorable character. Your one sentence reminded me of a story in Analog, years ago, and the internet confirms it was the sequel to Emergence.

      At supper high speeds, every extra mark counts, so, yes, they leave out everything they can, including many small predictable words.

      I'm a storyteller, as in perform live, from memory. One of the mistakes new tellers, and new authors, make with characterization is over-doing the accent. A hint is all that's needed, and too much makes it harder for the listener. Palmer took a risk, and it paid off. We readers could still understand it, and it added to the characterization. It showed she wanted to be efficient, but also wanted others to be able to read it.

      I remember practicing while my first child went to sleep. He wouldn't let me leave the room, but I could sit at his little table. By that time at night, though, I didn't have enough brain-power left to do more than blindly copy.

      Enough digression. Welcome to the group.

    3. Watching my kids learn to read, I had a lot more sympathy than many other parents. Converting strange marks to English, and vice-versa, is not easy, but most adults don't remember how hard it was to learn, or how to motivate kids with success reading things they enjoy.

    4. Thanks for the welcome! Yes, Carlos, I got my Functional I this week, along with several other books, though not FM II.

      Cricket, I'm sure I have that copy of Analog not ten feet from me at this moment. I don't remember the sequel though.

      And I agree that this sort of learning experience is valuable for teachers and parents.

    5. Beth, it is thrilling to hear about other Dvorak typists! I learnt to touch-type on Dvorak, never becoming proficient at QWERTY. Colleagues of mine, surprised to produce gibberish when typing at my computer, initiate conversations driven by either curiosity or incredulity on their part.

  25. Hi folks-
    Thanks for letting me join this community. I'm a freelance journalist in London but actually started learning Simplified more to help me empathise with the adults learning Hebrew to whom I teach evening classes than anything else!

  26. Hello to everybody here and thanks for inviting me to this blog. I have always had an odd fascination with all kinds of shorthand through the years. I played around with a manual machine stenotype for a while, fiddled around with Teeline and Pitman off and on and even delved into the old Gurney shorthand system (which Teeline stoled some of its ideas from by the way) but always end up back with the more graceful Gregg.
    I'm pretty rusty at this time but with some downtime am trying to get back into it as I have ruled out all of the above alternatives for good now. I like reading other shorthand writers in the pdfs here because the regular books are usually all written by Rader so seeing other examples broadens the reading ability.

  27. Hi, everybody (and fellow shorthandophiles!). I am probably the antique of the group, as I have been writing Gregg for longer than I care to admit (more than 50 years).

    I learned on Simplified, which was the newest version at the time, but I had a wonderful, old-timer teacher who had been one of the first U.S. Congressional court reporters, and he encouraged me to learn anniversary and pre-anniversary for more speed and efficiency. Which I did. He even shared some of his reporting shortcuts, which I use to this day.

    My career path was journalism, so Gregg was a mainstay in getting stories, interviews, and, most importantly, direct quotes. I occasionally used a small tape recorder (although it seemed to make some people self-conscious), and one time I placed it too near some electrical equipment. The upshot was that the interference made the interview almost impossible to understand. Without my trusty Gregg, I would have been up the proverbial creek without a paddle.

    Although I am retired, I use Gregg almost daily, and I am a great advocate of pre-anny. True, it does have a monumental, but not insurmountable, memory load, but it is still the fastest, most efficient version ever developed in my view, and I highly recommend it.

    I was a member of this group several years back, and I look forward to taking part once again. Let's keep Gregg alive!

  28. Hi everyone,

    Wow, it's really cool to read everybody's background and experience with shorthand! I'm a sociology graduate student hoping to learn Gregg well enough to take notes in class and, ideally, to take notes of field interviews; but so far I've spent most of my time attempting to work through my frustrations with the pedagogical peculiarities of the Anniversary Manual (yes, I know I should probably track down the FM manuals).

    My goal is to at least get to the point where my shorthand is faster than my longhand, though unfortunately I don't have as much time as I'd like to practice shorthand during the term. Hopefully all the great reading material on the blog here will help me practice in small bits where and when I can!

    Anyway, I have a lot of questions which I hope I'll get around to posting soon, but for now I just wanted to say hi, glad to be here, and thanks already to you all for the amazing content here that helps keep shorthand alive in the twenty-first century!

    1. David, your comment about learning to write shorthand at least as fast as longhand triggered memories of my own struggle with that. Because the mechanics and flow of shorthand is new and different, the tendency is to "draw" the forms rather that making a smooth "writing" stroke. My teacher said not to worry about this but to practice faithfully, and the transition of flow would come, at some point, almost automatically. It did.

      And, while reading well-written shorthand is invaluable in word recognition, nothing takes the place of putting pen to paper for developing speed and naturalness. Once you accomplish it, you'll think, "Duh? Why was this so hard?" Stay with it. You'll be glad you did!

    2. Those are excellent points, Mary.

      David, I also believe you can still practice shorthand during the term. Write the words you already know in shorthand in your own notes instead of longhand, for example, the common brief forms and phrases (how many times we write "in the", "of the", etc.). You will progress very quickly, and writing shorthand will become second nature.

  29. Hi everyone! I'm currently switching from Speedwriting to Notehand. I'm starting with Notehand because I don't really need exact dictation at the moment, but more importantly it's simple and has solutions to all exercises. Eventually I'd like to learn Simplified, DJ, or one of newer systems I haven't checked out. Maybe anniversary one of these days. Either way, I'm glad to just know about Gregg, this fantastic dying art

    1. Notehand (the 1968 edition) was my introduction to shorthand . . . in an actual high school classroom, by the way, with an actual shorthand teacher (hard to imagine today that there were people who taught shorthand full-time as their careers).

      After that I learned Diamond Jubilee, and it's my "go to" version.

  30. Hello,

    My name is Jeremy. My interest in Gregg is two-fold. One, my hands have essential tremor so standard handwriting (or hand anything) takes a little more time and focus. My desire is to at least increase the efficiency with which I write if not the speed. Two, I am a hobby linguist. Linguistics was part of my degree in school and Gregg intrigues me in that some of the ideas and principles behind it are fascinating.

    I have been learning Simplified Gregg for the past four months now and am able to write in it with the same speed as I write in standard hand writing.

    I am grateful for the expanded resources this blog provides and hope to contribute what I learn.

    Jeremy

  31. Hello,

    I don't remember how I fell upon Gregg Shorthand online, but I found it very fun. I started studying it for a bit before stopping for a few years. I have recently started learning it again. I am a few months into my study of Pre-Anniversary and Anniversary. I am writing a mix of both, taking whatever is fastest and most logical from both versions.

    I am writing a Gregg dictionary that will allow anyone to look up words and phrases more quickly than searching through the PDFs [1]. Eventually I would like to generate Gregg from text.

    Carlos pointed me to Chance's previous attempt at this, where I saw that Tyler had also attempted it, so I will look at these.

    Good luck in everyone's studies!

    Paul

    [1]: http://repo.or.cz/gregg.git

    1. Welcome to the blog, Paul! I have updated the link for the original shorthand_nopy.zip in Chance's post. I also have a copy of the old Greggory if you wish. I cannot find the latest version of Chance's program, but maybe someone in the blog may have a copy.

    2. There's an online converter on a German website:
      http://steno.tu-clausthal.de/
      This site allows conversion to DEK. Gregg, Pitman, and Suetterlin cursive script. If you select DEK or Suetterlin, the directions appear in German. If you select Gregg or Pitman, the directions are in English. The conversions are imperfect–or at least that's the case for Gregg and Pitman. Still, it's an interesting piece of work.

  32. Somehow I think I remember that the paper was written, but I never tried to obtain it. I've got it now, though, and it looks like it should be interesting to me. I'm not only a Gregg user, but also an advanced LaTeX user, and I'm somewhat interested in METAFONT, though I'm not too knowledgeable about it.

  33. Where can I obtain keys to these three please:

    Gregg Shorthand Anniversary Edition (1930)?

    Gregg Shorthand Manual Simplified (McGraw Hill 2nd ed.) ?

    Graded Readings in Gregg Shorthand (Anniversary Edition)?

     

     

  34. Hi everyone,

    Dustin here.  Glad to of found this site and start my learning of Gregg Anni and help keep the tradition alive as well as aquire a useful skill set. I'm eagerly awaiting the F.M. series. I've always thought it's amazing how shorthand that looks like Arabic can be interpreted. I've also purchased fountain pens from The Goulet Company (also on Youtube) and I highly recommend them. I feel like I'm going full out nastalgia. Look forward to learning. 

    1. Dustin

      You might try the Mitsubishi Uniball (fine) black waterproof. I have two fountain pens but this uniball is easier to use. I bought a box of a dozen on Amazon.

      Len

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