Let’s have a show of hands..

I would love to know a couple of things: how fast do you write right now? What was your fastest? What version do you write?  I will go first.  Right now i am probably around 40-60 wpm.  My fastest is probably around 80 wpm.  I write Anni.

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  1. I'm slow, too, at only about 50 wpm with Notehand edition (but I only worked through and completed the Notehand book last summer, so I'm still a newbie in a lot of ways). Before Notehand, I took one semester of Diamond Jubilee back in high school (over 30 years ago) but I don't remember what speed I reached then (and I never used it again after the class, at least not until very recently). I'm actively back into it now and working to increase my speed, though. I'm much more dedicated this time around than I was in high school.

  2. My speed at this point is roughly between 60-70 wpm. I, too, studied DJS in high school, reaching 90 wpm and using it at a few post-high school jobs. But I have used it continuously for note-taking in university and workshop settings. About 11 years ago I got serious about honing my skills and have gotten my speed up to the present 60 wpms after years of sporadic use. I love being able to use it purposefully now and with more confidence once again.

  3. I took DJS in high school. I guess I'm fortunate, because it was in the early 80's and our school still had the DJS books. I don't know my speed, because I just use it for personal reasons.

  4. I've been interested in shorthand for many years, and write DJ modified with some of the short forms from earlier editions of Gregg. I'd never tried to force my speed or measure it until today. I decided to start at 40 wam, but that's too slow. I went on to one dictation at 50 wam, and that was still a bit slow. I suspect I'm at 60 or 70. I'll report back when I know more.

  5. Trying to write Anni, but imperfectly as I haven't learned all the briefs yet. But I started copying some short texts of interest recently, and tried my first time trials for to respond to this thread!

    I feel a little silly doing time trials with new texts because I run into so many words for which it's my first time writing the word and so I know my wpm will be improving. And if I'm really aiming for time then I would neglect the theory and write phonetically just to get it down for many of these words.

    But I'm finding that, however messy the process is, it's worth it as it motivates my brief memorization. After time trials, I get a real strong internalized feeling of how fun it would be to write those long words with only a few shapes, and I find myself picking up the 5000 brief booklet with gusto. 😀

    So I did a bunch of proverbs and my raw wpm ranged from 12 wpm to 40 wpm, for short one-proverb bursts.

    http://homepage.smc.edu/reading_lab/american_english_proverbs.htm

    Are you all quoting raw wpm also? I know that some contests use some kind of averaged 5-letter word or something.

  6. The speed I mentioned above was for cold dictation. By the way, I've noticed that if I practice a passage a couple of times at increasing speeds (but not too fast), then I can take cold dictation at a faster speed than I could have without the warm-up.

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