Shorthand speed vs. keyboard typing speed

Hello, I was talking to a family member who studies in college. He was explaining that most students take their laptops in class and simply type the oral lectures given by teachers directly on their laptops, because their typing speed is much faster than their note-taking speed. According to him, he can type about 4…

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I had

Reading Carlos’ transcription (Anniversary) of Santa’s letter, and seeing “I had” written as [1] made me think of the various similar forms: I had, he had, we had, they had (also you had, & who had). 1,2,3,4,5,&6 are consistent, however the manual (paragraph 148 in my ©1930 copy) show us 7,8,9,&10 (I had, we had,…

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Fishing in Paris

There are many ways of fishing, however, American author and Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck preferred the Parisian style of fishing. In this essay, he describes with his unique perceptive and in humorous fashion, how different it is from the American and British styles of fishing; here presented in Anniversary Gregg and transcribed by me…

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“No. 10”

This excellent article gives some details about 10 Downing Street, or Number 10 as it is known in the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister’s residence and office, here transcribed in Simplified Gregg for the blog by yours truly. Attachment: no-10.pdf

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-ctive, -ctivity

Hello, I’ve been slowly incorporating some elements of Anniversary into my DJS shorthand, the latest one being the tiv/div blend at the end of words (as in active, which I used to write with a normal T stroke and a V. However, as I wondered about the best angle to position the DEV blend right after the…

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A Little Shakespeare

Here is the well-known “To be or not to be” soliloquy from Hamlet, transcribed by me in Anniversary. I’ve used a Sharpie Roller 0.5 mm pen which has a slightly thicker line than I’m used to, but of all the pens I’ve tried out this is the only one that never skips. Attachment: to-be-or-not-to-be.pdf

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Are You Listening?

Are You Listening?, written in the late 1950s by Ralph G. Nichols and Leonard A. Stevens, is a classic in the area of communication, and it highlights the importance of listening and how people do it. The book is available in archive.org. Here are some excerpts written in Centennial Gregg by me. Attachment: are-you-listening.pdf

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Walt Disney Goes to War

This excellent article by American writer J. P. McEvoy describes Walt Disney’s early days and how he eventually became involved in the war effort. I transcribed it in Anniversary Gregg for the blog. Attachment: walt-disney-goes-to-war.pdf

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