Viruses

The two most common causative agents of infectious diseases are viruses and bacteria. Both are invisible to the naked eye, allowing for their stealthy transfer from person to person during an outbreak of a contagious disease. Here is a small selection discussing viruses, transcribed in Centennial Gregg for the blog by yours truly. Attachment: viruses.pdf

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Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids

The double helix structure of a nucleic acid living in chromosomes, called DNA, short for deoxyribonucleic acid, is arguably the most recognizable icon in biology. In 1943, Oswald Avery discovered that DNA is the source of heredity. However, it would take almost 20 years and three scientists — James Watson, Francis Crick, and Maurice Wilkins —…

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French : En remontant le fleuve

This is the first stanza of a song by Hubert-Félix Thiéfaine (I haven’t transcribed his name properly). I like the imagery used in the (French) text. Please comment and correct. Thanks! Here is the French text and a (very) tentative English translation En remontant le fleuve au-delà des rapides (Going up the river, beyond the…

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Marc-Aurèle : citations (French)

Hello, in these particular times, I wanted to post something that can inspire. Marcus-Aurelius was known as ‘the philosopher king’ and here are almost all the quotes in English: 1 – “God give me patience, to reconcile with what I am not able to change Give me strength to change what I can And give…

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“Enter” and “entry”

A person in the Gregg Facebook group wonders why “entry” is written nt-r-e when there is a special short form for “enter”. I’ve checked the dictionaries, and I notice that this form for “entry” is used from Preanni onward. I too am puzzled now, particularly about Preanni, where the -ter rule held sway. Why is…

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Rare Gregg Writer Vol 2 on Google Books

Google Books recently scanned most of Gregg Writer Volume 2 from the Harvard library collection. The scan includes October 1899. It also includes February through September 1900. November, December, and January are missing from the Harvard collection and were not scanned. (For Volume 2, the magazine ran from October 1899 through September 1900.) Google Books…

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