Vocabulary Studies for Stenographers

I stumbled upon a very interesting book published in 1922 by The Gregg Publishing Company. Titled “Vocabulary Studies for Stenographers”, it was authored by Enoch Newton Miner. The book contains the pronunciation, definition, and shorthand outlines of “words in most common use among educated people which frequently are, in different ways, most perplexing to the…

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Stuff that is not written in practice

Although the Gregg shorthand manual teaches you to write several dots and ticks to represent certain things, a lot of these are not written in practice (1916 and Anniversary): The h dot can be omitted in most circumstances apart from certain words like “who….” The diphthong “ai” can be written as an “a” in a…

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Gregg shorthand and contractions

How does everybody here deal with contractions? I am interested in 1916 Gregg Shorthand and verbatim reporting. What I understand, in non-broadcast captioning, machine stenographers do distinguish between contractions and non-contracted versions. In broadcast captioning an element of paraphrasing does occur. In court reporting, there is some grammar correction of the transcript. In parliamentary reporting,…

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The Crusader and the Puritan

Before becoming Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, Oliver Wendell Holmes was something of a feature on the lecture circuit. This speech was delivered at the 250th Anniversary of the First Church in Cambridge, February 12, 1886. I transcribed it in Centennial Gregg for the blog. Attachment: the-crusader-and-the-puritan.pdf  

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Simplified to Diamond Jubilee Changes

It is my understanding that in Simplified, if you want to add –ed to a word whose root outline does not include a stroke for the final consonant sound of the root word, the added t or d stroke is disjoined, and that one of the changes made in going from Simplified to Diamond Jubilee…

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Lettres de mon moulin

Hello, first paragraph of the book of short stories, “Lettres de mon moulin” by Alphonse Daudet. (I’m not very happy about my “lapin”, the “p” curves difficultly…) Again feel free to criticize… Edit: changes made.

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