The Dear Departed

This entertaining story by American fiction writer Alice-Mary Schnirring was later on adapted by Rod Serling into an episode of his TV series Night Gallery. Here it is, written by me for the blog in Centennial Gregg. Attachment: the-dear-departed.pdf

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Discovery of the New World

In addition to his short stories Rip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, Washington Irving was a historian. In 1828 he wrote A History of the Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus, a four-volume biographical account of Christopher Columbus. Here is an extract from Volume I, Book III, Chapter IV, in which Columbus…

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The Lake

From the pen of the great Ray Bradbury, here is the original version of the story, in Simplified Gregg transcribed by yours truly. Attachment: the-lake.pdf

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The Monroe Doctrine

These famous words occur in President’s Monroe message to Congress on December 2, 1823. The words were brought forth by the fear that European powers, most of which were at the time wedded to monarchical ideas, might attempt to acquire territory in South America and extend their political ideas. Some of the South American states…

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Patriotism Needs Intelligence

General Francis Marion (1732-1795) served in the American Revolutionary War. His irregular methods of warfare became well known, and he is considered one of the fathers of modern guerrilla and maneuver warfare. He is credited in the lineage of the Green Berets of the U.S. Army. His biography The Life of General Francis Marion by…

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President Washington’s Receptions

William Sullivan (1774-1839) was a prominent Boston lawyer, Federalist politician, and author. Sullivan was admitted to the Massachusetts Bar in 1795, served on the Massachusetts General Court (1804-1830), and was a delegate to the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention (1830). From 1830, he devoted most of his career to writing about political institutions of the United States….

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A Child’s Dream of a Star

One of Dickens’ most beautiful stories, it first appeared in the April 6, 1850 issue of the weekly journal Household Words, in which he was editor. The story later appeared in book form and illustrated. I transcribed in Centennial Gregg for the blog. Attachment: a-childs-dream-of-a-star.pdf

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Destruction of Pompeii

This vivid description of the Vesuvius eruption and the damage it caused in Pompeii — here in Anniversary Gregg transcribed by me — comes from the pen of the English writer and politician Edward Bulwer-Lytton in his novel The Last Days of Pompeii. Lord Lytton’s works are the source of famous phrases, such as “the…

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