Early Gregg Writer Magazines now Available on Google Books

Harvard Library recently allowed Google Books to scan all Gregg Writer magazine issues in their collection that were not already scanned. (Google Books scanned some full volumes years ago. Those are available through Google Books and the Haiti Trust.) The recent scans include Gregg Writer magazine issues from 1901-1918. These scans include: —Complete Volumes: 4,…

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O. Henry Stories in Gregg Shorthand

Please help me test a new PDF file that contains ten O. Henry short stories written in Gregg Shorthand. The stories were serialized in 22 issues of the Gregg Writer magazine. All of the stories are in the public domain. This PDF file is not viewable on the Internet Archive viewer. You need to download…

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The Hour for Meditation

The importance of taking time for meditation was recognized even in the early part of the 20th century, when this small article appeared in many newspapers of the era. Here it is transcribed in Centennial Gregg by me for the blog. Attachment: the-hour-for-meditation.pdf

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Vocabulary Studies for Stenographers

I stumbled upon a very interesting book published in 1922 by The Gregg Publishing Company. Titled “Vocabulary Studies for Stenographers”, it was authored by Enoch Newton Miner. The book contains the pronunciation, definition, and shorthand outlines of “words in most common use among educated people which frequently are, in different ways, most perplexing to the…

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Stuff that is not written in practice

Although the Gregg shorthand manual teaches you to write several dots and ticks to represent certain things, a lot of these are not written in practice (1916 and Anniversary): The h dot can be omitted in most circumstances apart from certain words like “who….” The diphthong “ai” can be written as an “a” in a…

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Gregg shorthand and contractions

How does everybody here deal with contractions? I am interested in 1916 Gregg Shorthand and verbatim reporting. What I understand, in non-broadcast captioning, machine stenographers do distinguish between contractions and non-contracted versions. In broadcast captioning an element of paraphrasing does occur. In court reporting, there is some grammar correction of the transcript. In parliamentary reporting,…

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