Shorthand Sightings on the Web

  I came across a couple of blogs that had recent articles about shorthand.  The first one is about using shorthand to write a novel: Get Your Story in Hand Using Shorthand The second is about genealogy and shorthand: WRITING YOUR FAMILY HISTORY-IN SHORTHAND? Happy reading!  

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A Proclamation by the King

On October 27, 1775, King George III spoke before both houses of the British Parliament to discuss the growing concern about the rebellion in America, which he viewed as a traitorous action against himself and Great Britain. He began his speech by reading a “Proclamation of Rebellion” and urged Parliament to move quickly to end…

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Nathan Hale

One of the heroes of the American Revolution, this selection written by his great-great-grandniece is a fitting tribute. I transcribed it in Anniversary for the blog. Attachment: nathan-hale.pdf

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Letter to Abigail Adams

President John Adams (1735-1826) and Abigail Smith Adams (1744-1818) exchanged over 1,100 letters, beginning during their courtship in 1762 and continuing throughout President Adam’s political career (until 1801). These warm and informative letters include his descriptions of the Continental Congress and his impressions of Europe while he served in various diplomatic roles, as well as…

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Notehand Bingo fun

My kids are finally far enough along in the Notehand textbook that they can play the Notehand Bingo game I created for them last year.  Anyway, I had a little fun today making a box for all the bingo supplies.  Just thought I’d share.    

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Deseret Alphabet on Atlas Obscura

Last year I posted about the Deseret Alphabet created by George D. Watts.   The alphabet appears to be alive and well.  There’s an article about it this week on the Atlas Obscura website.  I’m rather envious:  they have published many classics and even the Bible in this alphabet.  If only someone was doing that…

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Underwater Spaceship

The USS Nautilus was the world’s first atomic submarine. It served from 1954 through 1980. If you’re near the Groton, CT area, you can visit the Submarine Force Museum, and tour the Nautilus. The submarine is better remembered for being the first ship to cross the North Pole. Terence Kay in his book “Space Volunteers”…

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