Are You Listening?

Are You Listening?, written in the late 1950s by Ralph G. Nichols and Leonard A. Stevens, is a classic in the area of communication, and it highlights the importance of listening and how people do it. The book is available in archive.org. Here are some excerpts written in Centennial Gregg by me. Attachment: are-you-listening.pdf

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Pride in Ancestry

This extract about the importance of maintaining a relationship between our ancestors and our posterity, comes from American lawyer and statesman Daniel Webster’s Discourse in Commemoration of the First Settlement of New England, delivered at Plymouth on the December 22, 1820. Here it is presented in Centennial Gregg, transcribed by yours truly. Attachment: pride-in-ancestry.pdf

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The Dear Departed

This entertaining story by American fiction writer Alice-Mary Schnirring was later on adapted by Rod Serling into an episode of his TV series Night Gallery. Here it is, written by me for the blog in Centennial Gregg. Attachment: the-dear-departed.pdf

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The Monroe Doctrine

These famous words occur in President’s Monroe message to Congress on December 2, 1823. The words were brought forth by the fear that European powers, most of which were at the time wedded to monarchical ideas, might attempt to acquire territory in South America and extend their political ideas. Some of the South American states…

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A Child’s Dream of a Star

One of Dickens’ most beautiful stories, it first appeared in the April 6, 1850 issue of the weekly journal Household Words, in which he was editor. The story later appeared in book form and illustrated. I transcribed in Centennial Gregg for the blog. Attachment: a-childs-dream-of-a-star.pdf

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The Fourth of July in Westminster Abbey

Phillips Brooks was an American Episcopal clergyman and Bishop of Massachusetts. Renowned for his charismatic preaching, he was invited in 1880 to preach at Westminster Abbey in London and at the Royal Chapel at Windsor before Queen Victoria. After his sermon on July 4 of the same year titled The Candle of the Lord, he…

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Viruses

The two most common causative agents of infectious diseases are viruses and bacteria. Both are invisible to the naked eye, allowing for their stealthy transfer from person to person during an outbreak of a contagious disease. Here is a small selection discussing viruses, transcribed in Centennial Gregg for the blog by yours truly. Attachment: viruses.pdf

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