A First Assessment of the Sinking of the Titanic

The following speech was delivered at the inauguration of the classes on Naval Architecture at Glasgow University in 1912, after the Titanic disaster, by Professor John Harvard Biles, at the time Vice-President of the Institution of Naval Architects. He discussed the causes of the loss of the Titanic and the proposals of the Board of…

Continue Reading

La Marseillaise

For our francophone writers and in celebration of Bastille Day (la Fête nationale française, le 14 juillet), the story of La Marseillaise, as told by the French author, poet, and statesman Alphonse de Lamartine, and transcribed by yours truly in Sténographie Gregg (both Anniversary and Simplified) for the blog. Attachment: la-marseillaise-anniv.pdf Attachment: la-marseillaise-simpl.pdf

Continue Reading

The Advantages and Disadvantages of the Revolution

David Ramsay was one of the American Revolution’s first major historians. Although trained as a physician, during the Revolutionary War he was a member of the South Carolina legislature. Since he was personally involved in the events of the revolution (him serving as field surgeon in the South Carolina militia and his brother Nathaniel as…

Continue Reading

Améliorer son vocabulaire

Here is small selection transcribed in Sténographie Gregg by yours truly for the blog (both in Anniversary and Simplified). Attachment: améliorer-son-vocabulaire-anniv.pdf Attachment: améliorer-son-vocabulaire-simpl.pdf

Continue Reading

The USS Nautilus: A Revolution in Sea Travel

The USS Nautilus (SSN-571), sharing its name with Captain Nemo’s fictional submarine in Jules Verne’s classic 1870 science fiction novel Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, was the world’s first operational nuclear-powered submarine. It was the first to complete a submerged transit of the North Pole on August 3, 1958. Decommissioned in 1980, it is…

Continue Reading

Eleven Days over Death

Straddling the Arctic Circle, the Great Bear Lake, in the Northwest Territories of Canada, is the largest lake entirely in Canada, the fourth-largest in North America, and the eighth-largest in the world. At just over 12,000 square miles, it is bigger than Belgium. Its maximum depth of 1,463 feet makes it deeper than Lake Superior….

Continue Reading

Our 7-Mile Dive to Bottom – Part 1

The Mariana Trench, located in the western Pacific Ocean, is the deepest oceanic trench on Earth. Measuring about 1,580 miles in length and 43 miles in width, its maximum known depth is 36,037 feet (about 7 miles), located at the southern end of a small valley in its floor known as the Challenger Deep. If…

Continue Reading